Twilight on the River

“The pictures which do not represent an intense interest cannot expect to create an intense interest.” – Robert Henri

Familiar landscapes can seem limiting, and they often are if approached in the same way. But light is always dynamic, with infinite possibilities for tonal and color variation, and for discovering the undercurrent of a place or subject. 

The undercurrent is something famed painter and teacher Robert Henri talked about often, contrasting it with surface appearance which may be “novel and attractive at first, but soon grows  tiresome.”

He suggests that every potential subject has this undercurrent, which comes from the personal experience of the artist, the emotional attachment to the subject or moment. It’s this moment that I refer to often, because it’s the only thing I think matters for any real connection to the viewer.

Light continually generates new and exciting experiences for me regardless of where I am. And it’s that combined with study, curiosity, and living life fully that makes an image captivating. 

 

This Post Has 2 Comments
  1. Robert,

    I do really like very much how you create an experience where I, as a viewer, start with landscape distances, smooth clouds, volume and subtle tonality, to end with a very graphical (Zen garden?) arrangement of hard, irregular shapes that are really almost flat black, yet you can still feel the slow movement of the water. Exquisite.
    /mike
    BTW – You inspired me to use Canson papers 🙂

  2. I’ve found your vision so helpful in finding my own vision. Your work gives me peace and I hope to build my vision into something filled with peace and beauty. I ordered your book https://robertrodriguezjr.com/creativepathbook I may have used my shipping address as my billing address. Please let me know that you received the payment. Thanks for everything you do! Jackie

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